Intel's Sandy Bridge Processor PC Hardware...


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DatahopaForumComputer RelatedPC HardwareIntel's Sandy Bridge Processor



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Intel's Sandy Bridge Processor

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Offline Snowcrash Topic starter
England Global Moderator
Posts: 2809
Rank: Certified

This is one to keep an eye on. Looks like LGA1366 is dead then.

The Sandy Bridge processor will be LGA1155 one less than current and not compatable  Embarrassed

Here for pic
http://news.softpedia.com/news/Intel-039-s-32nm-Sandy-Bridge-Gets-Unveiled-115948.shtml

Here for more in depth
http://www.bit-tech.net/hardware/cpus/2010/04/21/intel-sandy-bridge-details-of-the-next-gen/1

And here from the horse's mouth... 4th paragraph
http://www.intel.com/pressroom/archive/releases/20100412comp.htm
Posted May 13, 2010, 20:17:33 PM Logged
“I cannot remember the books I've read any more than the meals I have eaten; even so, they have made me.”

Ralph Waldo Emerson

Offline Snowcrash Topic starter
England Global Moderator
Posts: 2809
Rank: Certified

Chip architecture...



Sandy Bridge.jpg
Intel's Sandy Bridge Processor
* Sandy Bridge.jpg (50.04 KB, 420x267 - viewed 466 times.)
Posted May 13, 2010, 20:21:59 PM Logged
“I cannot remember the books I've read any more than the meals I have eaten; even so, they have made me.”

Ralph Waldo Emerson

Offline Data
United Kingdom Administrator
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Good find Snowcrash, It seems a little odd that the new socket will have less pins, the norm being more pins with the next generation.
Posted May 14, 2010, 13:43:24 PM Logged

Offline Snowcrash Topic starter
England Global Moderator
Posts: 2809
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I have heard a rumor from Bit Tech hardware 13 podcast that Intel are thinking of setting up the chip in such a way that FSB clocking will not work.
This comes on the back of the 'k' series intel chips out now/soon that have the multiplier unlocked. This was only seen on the extreme edition processors.
I think the 'k' series chips will have limited appeal due to the ease of clocking using FSB. Maybe ok if you don't have a clockers board but if it's a cheap budget board then clocking is probably a bad idea anyway. Power regulators tend to go pop.
Click here for 'k' series review conclusion.
Posted August 10, 2010, 11:21:11 AM Logged
“I cannot remember the books I've read any more than the meals I have eaten; even so, they have made me.”

Ralph Waldo Emerson

Offline Snowcrash Topic starter
England Global Moderator
Posts: 2809
Rank: Certified

Found this as a fair point to the 'k' series...


"I think you've overlooked an important aspect. By overclocking only the multiplier, you are not forced to disable Turbo, enabling you to have an overclocked chip while still maintaining low idle power consumption. This would, at least for me, be an important factor when buying a CPU."

What do you think?
Posted August 10, 2010, 11:26:54 AM Logged
“I cannot remember the books I've read any more than the meals I have eaten; even so, they have made me.”

Ralph Waldo Emerson

Offline Data
United Kingdom Administrator
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Interesting, I can see why Intel might consider making their CPU’s more easily clockable, to them its got to be a selling point, overclockers have been calling for it for years, so really I’m all for it, but, and I think it’s a big but, to stop the ability of overclocking the FSB I’m not for.

Overclock with the FSB you speed up more than just the CPU, i.e. memory bus and font side bus, as long as you know what you are doing, that way you end up with a faster PC than one clocked by the multiplier, given the same MHz clock speed.

Clocking with the multiplier is also going to be done in large steps, a few hundred MHz at a time, where as on a decent mobo it can be done by as little as 1 Mhz steps.

Intel should unlock the multiplier and leave alone the FSB, then a clocker can have hours of fun finding the sweet spot of his CPU, first with the maximum multiplier it will do and then fine tuning with the FSB. Or maybe increase the multiplier by one and see how far it will go with the FSB.

Maybe ok if you don't have a clockers board but if it's a cheap budget board then clocking is probably a bad idea anyway. Power regulators tend to go pop.

I think you make a good point about cheaper motherboards that cant really handle the power requirements of a clocked CPU going pop. Some surely will  Huh?

My thoughts  Roll Eyes

Posted August 10, 2010, 16:41:21 PM Logged

Offline Snowcrash Topic starter
England Global Moderator
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It seems the 'k' series is more a PR stunt then anything new.

It seems to be a reply to AMDs black edition which has the multiplier unlocked.

And at £200 for the ks and about £160 for the i5 & core 2 quads not sure why you'd pay the extra £40. Get an i7, they're still better.
Posted August 11, 2010, 00:24:42 AM Logged
“I cannot remember the books I've read any more than the meals I have eaten; even so, they have made me.”

Ralph Waldo Emerson

Offline Carl2
United States Posts: 935
Rank: Baron

  I'd read a few weeks ago that intel was unlocking some of it's processors,  not big on overclocking so don't really care.  Since the six core processor Intel has uses the 1366 I think it will be around, because of the price the sales may be low.
  I like the capability of handling 130 W.  To me it's a little similar to a transistor without a heat sink, say it can handle 10 W,  connect it to a large heat sink and it can handle 75 W.
Carl2
Posted August 12, 2010, 22:22:18 PM Logged

Offline Carl2
United States Posts: 935
Rank: Baron

   Just passing this on, just got an advertisement about Gigabites motherboards made for the Sandy Bridge processors.  Thay seem to have all the latest features such as the 6 gb/sec.
Carl2
Posted November 04, 2010, 13:15:39 PM Logged

Offline Data
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Thanks for that Carl2, interesting too, I always use Gigabyte boards these days and personally I think they are among the best boards around, its good to see they are still at the forefront. 
Posted November 04, 2010, 15:33:51 PM Logged

Offline Carl2
United States Posts: 935
Rank: Baron

  I'd used a Gigabyte board in a build ages ago,  it had a problem, Took athe whole thing apart to get it running on a desktop, still some problem, tried some things and RMA'd  it to gigabyte.  When it came back it worked for about a week,  switched to an Asus board.  Lately I've been looking at Intel because of the Rock solid which I hear about their MB's.
Carl2

 
Posted November 04, 2010, 20:53:50 PM Logged

Offline Data
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Used Intel boards a few times, like you say, they do seem to be rock solid, I found them very fast booting too, great boards, unless you want to clock your PC, they aren’t really the ones for that.

Seen many makes of motherboards go wrong ,always a bad one in the bunch kind of thing. For me I would be looking at a Gigabyte board for my next build and for the PC’s I build people Gigabyte boards tend to suit their price rang better and have been very reliable, I remember one going wrong but that was an older VIA chipset board.   
Posted November 05, 2010, 19:10:18 PM Logged

Offline Freddy
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Both Gigabyte and Asus I have used.  Seem good to me.
Posted November 05, 2010, 19:26:17 PM Logged

Offline Carl2
United States Posts: 935
Rank: Baron

  The Intel Sandy Bridge is being sold at Newegg, it seems to be a reasonable price for the latest and greatest.  I think it is a 95 watt processor, I still like the 130 watts,  helps keep you warm in the winter.  I probably don't go anywhere near 130 W's, probably stays close to Idle power.
Carl2
Posted January 21, 2011, 21:29:17 PM Logged

Offline Data
United Kingdom Administrator
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So its begun, the next bread of Intel CPU’s hits the market, haven’t found any over here in the UK yet, we are always behind the USA when it comes to new processors.

Thanks for letting us know Carl. thumbsup
Posted January 22, 2011, 11:54:20 AM Logged
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