1,000 terabytes on a DVD New Technology, Science...


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1,000 terabytes on a DVD

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Online Freddy Topic starter
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Quote
In Nature Communications today, we, along with Richard Evans from CSIRO, show how we developed a new technique to enable the data capacity of a single DVD to increase from 4.7 gigabytes up to one petabyte (1,000 terabytes). This is equivalent of 10.6 years of compressed high-definition video or 50,000 full high-definition movies.

http://theconversation.com/more-data-storage-heres-how-to-fit-1-000-terabytes-on-a-dvd-15306
Posted June 21, 2013, 12:00:05 PM Logged

Online Data
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Impressive technology but odd timing, the use of a spinning disks ?

Sounds very last century to me.
Posted June 21, 2013, 12:41:42 PM Logged

Online Freddy Topic starter
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They've always been very reliable to me  scratch-head
Posted June 21, 2013, 15:12:47 PM Logged

Online Data
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They've always been very reliable to me  scratch-head

But very slow  Sad

I wonder how long it would take to burn a 1.000 terabytes  scratch-head
Posted June 21, 2013, 15:17:11 PM Logged

Offline Snowcrash
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This doesn't appear to be a working technology. Just a theory based on a well known laser technique.
How do you think they make transistors at 22nm on the current Intel chips?

I've always thought solid state is the way to go. Cheap memristor chips would make this (and many other things) obsolete.
The beauty of a chip is you can change the data too.
Posted June 21, 2013, 19:40:56 PM Logged
“I cannot remember the books I've read any more than the meals I have eaten; even so, they have made me.”

Ralph Waldo Emerson
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